Welcome

Hi. My name is Spencer Mangum and I arrange hymns on the piano in my spare time. These songs are completely free and are here for you. The only thing I get out of doing this is the hope that other people will enjoy it. As I am LDS (aka mormon), a number of my arrangements are specific to my faith. However, I also have a number of arrangements of other traditional hymns that are common among most Christian denominations. If you like what you find here, please share this website with your friends. Also, please leave comments. It's the only way I know if you enjoy it or not.

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We Thank thee O God for a Prophet



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This hymn has been part of the LDS Hymnal since 1863. The text of this hymn was written by an English Mormon convert, William Fowler (1830-1865), and the music by Caroline Norton (1808-ca. 1877). Fowler wrote the hymn sometime between the age of 30-33, and died at the age of 35. Caroline Norton was not LDS nor was she even aware in her lifetime that Fowler had chosen her tune to carry his words (1). However, as no other poet ever adopted this tune to other words, this melody has become today unique to the LDS faith. Fowler's words celebrate that God has called modern prophets (just as he did in biblical times) through whom Jesus Christ's gospel is taught. The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

Come Come ye Saints



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This hymn has been part of the LDS hymnal since 1851. The text of this hymn was written in 1846 by English Mormon convert William Clayton (1814-1879). The melody for this hymn came from a popular English folk song "All is well". Clayton was among the first Mormon pioneers to make the trek from Nauvoo, Illinois to Utah. The text of this song was written while on the trail of that journey in response to news of the birth of his son back in Nauvoo (1). The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

Of note, while this hymn is originally LDS, it can also be found in the hymnal for both the United Church of Christ and Seventh-day Adventists (2).

"Sweet Hour of Prayer" Medley



This hymn arrangement combines the hymns "Sweet Hour of Prayer" and "In Humility, Our Savior".

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The text of "Sweet Hour of Prayer" was first published in the New York Observer in 1845. According to Thomas Salmon (the publisher of the article), the text had come from a blind English preacher named William Walford (1772-1850) who still resided in England (1). The music was subsequently composed by the musician William Bradbury (1816-1868) who notably also composed the music to "Jesus Loves Me" (2). The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

The text of "In Humility, Our Savior" was written by LDS Hymnwriter Mabel Jones Gabbott (1910-2004). So far as I can tell, it was first included in the LDS Hymnal in 1985. Gabbott also notably wrote the LDS Childrens Hymn "He Sent his Son". The text was set to music written by Welsh musician Rowland Pritchard (1811-1887). This same melody has actually been used for a number of different hymns, including "Love Divine, All Loves Excelling" (3). The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

In this arrangement, "Sweet Hour of Prayer" is set in a minor key because I am trying to capture the prayers of those pleading with God during times of immense loss or grief. The arrangement then transitions into "In Humility, Our Savior", to remind us that Jesus Christ himself has uttered such prayers too. In the garden of Gethsemane, just prior to performing the atonement and dying on the cross, Christ pled "Father, if thou be willing, remove this cup from me: nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done" (4). The text from "In Humility, Our Savior" eloquently states:

Let me not forget, O Savior,
Thou didst bleed and die for me
When thy heart was stilled and broken
On the cross at Calvary

In the final few lines of the arrangement, I transition back to a major key signifying the resolution of the prior loss or grief. Because of Christ's prayer: "not my will, but thine, be done" and his willingness to drink the "bitter cup", even our darkest prayers can indeed become sweet.

Abide Medley



This arrangement combines the hymns: "Abide with me; 'Tis Eventide" and "Abide With Me!"

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The hymn "Abide with me; 'Tis Eventide" was written in 1882 by M. Lowrie Hofford (1825-1888). He was an American theologist and graduate of the Princeton Seminary. The music was written by American Harrison Millard (1830-1895) and initially written under the title "Welcome Guest". Notably, both Hofford and Millard fought for the Union in the civil war, and it is speculated that their experiences there could have influenced the hymn. (1) The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

The hymn "Abide With Me" was written in 1847 by the Scottish Anglican Henry F Lyte (1793-1847). He reportedly was dying of tuberculosis as he wrote the hymn, and just finished the hymn three weeks prior to his death. The music was written in 1861 by London native William H Monk (1823-1889) (2). The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

(For the sheet music, a special thanks goes out to Neville who got a friend to transcribe the music for him. I unfortunately had not had the time to do this myself.)

Sisters All Are We

This is an original song written (words by Diane Mangum, music by Spencer Mangum) with the intent of being used at LDS Relief Society functions. It is a 3 part women's chorus with piano accompaniment.

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Joseph Smith Medley



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This medley incorporates: "Joseph Smith's First Prayer", "A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief", and "Praise to the Man".

"Joseph Smith's First Prayer" was written in 1878 by English LDS convert George Manwaring (1854-1889). Manwaring wrote this hymn after seeing a painting depicting the first vision that was deeply moving to him. The text of this hymn is set to the music "Divinity" by American composer Sylvanus Billings Pond (1792-1871), who died prior to the text's composition. The version of "Divinity" used in LDS hymnbooks is actually an adaptation by A.C. Smith (1840-1909), with some slight variation from the original music of "Divinity". (1) The full text and music in SATB format for this hymn can be found here.

"A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief" was written in 1826 by James Montgomery (1771-1854). It was originally written as a poem titled "The Stranger" and was not intended to be set to music. Sometime after this, a devout English Methodist Preacher named George Coles (1792-1858) set Montgomery's words to music, creating the hymn "A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief". (2) The full text and music in SATB format for this hymn can be found here.

"Praise to the Man" was written in 1844 by LDS convert W.W. Phelps (1792-1872). Phelps wrote this hymn in honor of Joseph Smith shortly after his martyrdom. Notably, for a time Phelps left the LDS church and declared himself an enemy to the Prophet Joseph Smith. In 1840, Phelps returned to the LDS Church. In asking Joseph Smith if he could forgive him, Joseph replied "Come on, dear brother, since the war is past. Friends at first, are again friends at last". (3) The music of this hymn is from a popular Scottish folk song. The full text and music in SATB format for this hymn can be found here.

In this arrangement, I chose these three hymns to depict three distinct and defining times of Joseph Smith's life. The first hymn ("Joseph Smith's First Prayer") describes Joseph's experience as a young man, seeing in vision both God the Father and Jesus Christ. This experience was the first of many that led to Joseph being called as a prophet of God, through whom Jesus Christ's gospel was restored. The second hymn ("A Poor Wayfaring Man of Grief"), was a favorite hymn of Joseph Smith's and was sung to him by a friend just moments prior to his murder at the hands of a mob (see martyrdom for details). The third hymn ("Praise to the Man") transitions to the time beyond Joseph's death. In this part of the arrangement, I envision the fullness of the gospel of Jesus Christ (as restored by Joseph Smith) being spread throughout the world, where "millions shall know 'Brother Joseph' again".



Silent Night



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The text of "Silent Night" was written by Father Joseph Mohr (1792-1848). The music was written by Franz Gruber (1787-1863). Father Mohr was a catholic priest in Austria and had written the poem "Stille Nacht! Heilige Nacht!" in 1816. On Christmas Eve 1818, Father Mohr asked his friend Franz Gruber to set the words to music. Gruber immediately completed the request, and the hymn was born and performed for the first time at their Christmas Mass. (1) The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

I Stand All Amazed



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The text and music of "I Stand All Amazed" was written in 1898 by Charles Gabriel (1856-1932). Gabriel grew up as a farm boy in Iowa, but eventually became the music director at Grace Methodist Episcopal Church in San Francisco California and later moved to Chicago. In his life, Gabriel was a prolific hymn writer. His hymn "I Stand All Amazed" is also known as "Oh it is Wonderful". The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here. (1)

I Need thee Every Hour



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"I Need Thee Every Hour" was first published in 1872. The text was first written by Annie S. Hawkes (1835-1918), with additional lyrics and music being composed by Robert Lowry (1826-1899). Lowry was a Baptist Minister in Brooklyn New York and had already successfully written several popular hymns prior to "I Need Thee Every Hour". Hawkes was a member of his congregation. Recognizing that Hawkes had talent as a poet, Lowry challenged her that if she wrote the words, he would write the music. Hawkes recalled that "One day as a young wife and mo­ther of 37 years of age, I was bu­sy with my reg­u­lar house­hold tasks. Sud­den­ly, I be­came so filled with the sense of near­ness to the Mast­er that, won­der­ing how one could live with­out Him, ei­ther in joy or pain, these words, 'I Need Thee Ev­e­ry Hour,' were ush­ered in­to my mind, the thought at once tak­ing full pos­sess­ion of me." Hawkes shortly after wrote the four verses of the hymn, with Lowry adding the chorus and music. (1, 2) The original hymn words and music in SATB format is available here.

Praise to the Lord, the Almighty



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The text of this hymn was written in 1680 by German Calvinist Joachim Neander (1650-1680). Neander set his music to the melody of "Lobe Den Herren" from the "Stralsund Gesangbuch" (Published in 1665. Stralsund is a german city with Gesangbuch simply being german for hymnal.) Catherine Winkworth then later translated this hymn to English in 1863. (1, 2). The original hymn words and music is available in SATB format here.